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Estonia: Victor Crone – Storm

  At the time of writing and in the context of this year's Eurovision lineup as it stands, Storm is a highly effective 3-minutes of radio-friendly pop performed by the super-charismatic - and very Swedish - Victor Crone. Watching Victor, I was reminded of Måns Zelmerlöw's performance of Heroes during the middle-eight and outro as he interacts with the cameras. Obviously Måns benefitted from a much stronger song and a more eye-catching stage production, yet this is still a valiant effort from Crone. It's quite a slick production if you breakdown and study the individual components of how the TV…
Song Appeal
Vocal Strength
Staging Potential
Likely Televote Appeal
Likely Jury Appeal

Stormer

Storm is a catchy, uplifting televote friendly song capable of making the left hand side of the scoreboard.

User Rating: 2.37 ( 41 votes)

 
At the time of writing and in the context of this year’s Eurovision lineup as it stands, Storm is a highly effective 3-minutes of radio-friendly pop performed by the super-charismatic – and very Swedish – Victor Crone. Watching Victor, I was reminded of Måns Zelmerlöw’s performance of Heroes during the middle-eight and outro as he interacts with the cameras.

Obviously Måns benefitted from a much stronger song and a more eye-catching stage production, yet this is still a valiant effort from Crone.

It’s quite a slick production if you breakdown and study the individual components of how the TV audience is brought on side with clever psychological cues:

  1. Opening guitar shot
  2. Girl appears
  3. Guitar goes for first chorus
  4. Måns-influenced walk
  5. Actors placed in audience – social confirmation
  6. Chorus with audience as backdrop – social confirmation
  7. Circling camera mirroring increased energy in arrangement
  8. Victor gesturing to audience – social confirmation
  9. Måns close up
  10. Common linnets camera circle
  11. Pre-recorded footage
  12. Ends with guitar

The psychology focusses on audience participation and enjoyment. It’s a technique used by the X-Factor UK and Britain’s Got Talent, though rather more crudely. Even so, the main success here is the flow and constant shift in the visual narrative which allows Victor to sell his song way beyond its normal capabilities. He appears earnest, relatable, and more importantly, voteable. At no point does the performance drag or feel like a long 3-minutes. Looking at the Eesti Laul voting, which Victor romped, it would appear the jury either tried to prevent Victor winning or attempted to construct a pre-determined super-final lineup – the points awarded simply do not tally with a song and performance of this calibre.

There are a range of opinions about Estonia’s chances in Tel Aviv, and to be honest I have no firm opinion one way or another, other than to point out that based on the songs released so far along with those in the pipeline, Storm is a catchy, uplifting televote friendly song capable of making the left hand side of the scoreboard.

About Gavster

ESCtips Owner   I’m a qualified designer and dedicate a lot of my free time to keeping the ESCtips show on the road. My family routes allow me to support the UK, Ireland and Italy.

20 comments

  1. It’s certainly not bad, but it feels very much like what was popular a couple of years ago. In this year’s field it stands out though, so it could do quite well.

  2. This cleverly constructed song takes the listener on a journey. The storm slowly builds, then hits in a big anthemic chorus, and finally there is the ‘Calm After The Storm’. The clever staging perfectly complements the song’s narrative.

    When the Eesti Laul entries first came out I picked out Storm as the obvious Eurovision song. I thought there was something there for both juries and televoters and that a top 10 finish in Tel Aviv was well within reach.

    But in the Eesti Laul final the international juries absolutely hated it. The reasons are not entirely clear. Was it Victor’s weak(ish) vocal? The song being too formulaic? Or perhaps it being an entry that should have gone to Eurovision 5 or 6 years ago and not now?

    Whatever the reason we probably have to assume that in Tel Aviv, Storm will be relying on televotes to do well. A second half draw in potentially the weaker first semi may be enough to see it through, but if it gets to the final it is likely to be up against several other strong televote friendly entries (Australia, Norway – if they send Spirit in the Sky, Sweden – if they send Fjallgren, not to mention the diaspora big hitters.)

    My guess is that any value in the betting market may come from opposing Estonia for top 10.

  3. I must hearing something different to other commentators…. I wonder what would be being said if this was the UKs entry…

  4. As always utterly respect everybody’s opinion but in my humble view… it is clinical, sanitised, trait and ‘we’ve heard that before’.

    It’s degree of sanitisation reminds me of a swimming pool. Meaning, you know that chlorine water which is designed to kill any living bacteria, good and bad. Even the look and smell of it is supposed to extinguish any degree of ‘other forms of life’ craziness.

    When Estonia sends a contender (which is not this one), they finish betweeen 6th and10th. Chlorinated exhibits of Estonian origin struggle to qualify (unless a semifinal is a mess). Not betting on this, but of course I could be all wrong.

  5. Weak song, gets high marks just because it has that universal pop sound that you *think* people might like.

    Same happened to X My Heart previous year and it flopped.

    This got an astoundingly bad jury score in the national final. France got dragged for flopping with the jurors, why does this entry not get the same treatment? The performance was weak.

  6. It’s a good and safe package that should appeal to televiewers and juries alike. The semifinal package was much worse and with less than stellar vocals, the juries likely remembered that and down rated in the finals as well.

    This should be the frontrunner until Sergey’s song is revealed.

    • Do you think Russia’s price is justified?

      • I don’t no, I’ve got a small lay bet on Russia to create betting opportunities. But Sergey and Russia is a very competitive team so I believe he is in the ballpark of a 1 in 8 chance of winning. Generally it’s a bad idea to bet on the unknown.

    • Juries only saw the semi performances, actually. All the jury clips were recorded before the final even happened.

      • Jeaz, what a terrible way to run a national final.

        • I guess it would have been hard to get all the people to show up live, especially the ones from USA, so they went the cheap & easy route. I don’t know why we had 4/7 jurors from the USA anyway, last I checked USA wasn’t taking part in Eurovision. Is their taste really the best thing to go by? I hope our producers will make some changes to the jury if they want to keep them for next year.

      • That explains it then!

  7. Dull. As. Fuck.

  8. X My Heart V Surie V Amazing. Absolutely anonymous, which is one of the greatest crimes to commit in this contest. Bland to the nth degree. No amount of turd polishing will matter much once all songs are out. Will be lucky to Q. Could easily pull a Verona. And I am usually a Stig fan.

  9. I think Stefan with “Without You” was the superior song in this year’s Eesti Laul. And, let’s not forget, 1st with jury’s and still neat 4th place with televoters. Also Uku Suviste was melody-wise more interesting to me than Victor Crone. He scored a nice 2nd place in the televote and an above average 6th place with jury’s.

    The disparity of the final results with Victor Crone is what struck me. Yes, a wonderful televoting score indeed. But charisma-wise Victor is too plastic-y for me. Vocally his reach is rather boring and sounds a bit like an average X-Factor candidate who doesn’t manage to enter the finals.

    Then the song. Really Gav, 4 stars? This kind of entry would have lost against the more visually striking Estonian Eurovision entries from 2015 and 2018.

    So I understand that juries punished this entry with an aex aequo 8th place. It’s simply not original enough. Hence I think this will be the biggest caveat on the road to Tel Aviv. We tend to focus on the televoting winners here and downgrade the jury fodder songs. I don’t find that very rational.

    In the end doing well in Eurovision is about this: Doing damn well with televoters and jury’s and vice versa. Estonia is clearly struggling with one component of the final results component. Just like Romania is struggling with another voting component.

    Nope, I don’t want to bet on this one. In general all 5 entries chosen this weekend are entirely lacklustre and suffer from one or the other results component (being either jury’s or televoters).

    13 songs down, 29 entries more to go…..

  10. If you read between the lines, I think you’ll find that I’ve committed to the song being capable of reaching the left hand side of the scoreboard, which tends to mean 11th-13th and ‘capable’ doesn’t mean ‘will’. If at this point I thought a high finish was possible I would have said top-10.

    I’ve mentioned Måns, but caveated that by highlighting Heroes was a better song and staging package.

    The 4-star song rating isn’t really 4-stars. It’s a glitch in the theme coding and there are only four numbers between the vocal and song rating, yet it when presented as stars, the gap looks much larger. This is still a slick package in the context of the Eurovision lineup – as it stands.

    In terms of past precedent, I think a Niels Brinck type result is about right. If the standard of songs selected remains low, then naturally competently produced and performed songs will stand out.

  11. I think “Storm” is being treated rather harshly. It doesn’t help that it shares the same song title as UK 2018, but I’d rather listen to this than just about anything chosen so far. If there’s no upturn in quality soon, I think 10th to 15th is easily possible for this.

  12. Still cannot compete with Ze-e-e-ro Gra-a-a-a-vity!

  13. There’s a strange disconnect between the song’s title and how it actually sounds. “Storm?” I feel a gentle breeze that you hardly feel and certainly won’t remember. But he’s easy on the eyeballs, and the song is not off putting either, so on the spur of the moment, viewers may well vote in numbers. What is quite likeable is that he is a pretty boy but he doesn’t play that off at all (unlike Switzerland’s Luca Hänni). No cheesy schmoosing with the camera – in fact he comes across as a bit insecure. But that may be because he knows his vocals may need some improving.
    He will benefit from being in a totally forgettable first half final (where even San Marino may go on to the final). But once in the final, he will dangle far south on the score board.

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